Short-, intermediate-, and long-term changes in basophil reactivity induced by venom immunotherapy

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Short-, intermediate-, and long-term changes in basophil reactivity induced by venom immunotherapy

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Title: Short-, intermediate-, and long-term changes in basophil reactivity induced by venom immunotherapy
Author: Rodríguez Trabado, Ana; Cámara Hijón, Carmen; Ramos Cantariño, Alfonso; Romero Chala, Silvia; García Trujillo, José Antonio; Fernández Pereira, Luis Miguel
Abstract: PURPOSE: The basophil activation test (BAT) has been used to monitor venom immunotherapy (VIT) due to its high specificity. A previous study has reported a good correlation between a significant decrease in basophil activation during 5 years of VIT and clinical protection assessed by sting challenge. The following prospective study was performed to examine changes in basophil reactivity over a complete VIT period of 5 years. METHODS: BAT in a dose-response curve was studied prospectively in 10 hymenoptera venom-allergic patients over 5 years of VIT. BAT was performed at the time of diagnosis, 1 month after finishing the VIT build-up phase, and 3, 6, 12, 24, and 60 months after beginning treatment. The repeated measures ANOVA was applied to evaluate basophil activation changes throughout VIT. A cross-sectional study was also performed in 6 patients who received treatment for more than 3 years, and in another 12 patients who followed immunotherapy for at least 5 years. RESULTS: An early activation decrease was observed during the first 3 months of treatment, compared to pre-treatment values. This activation decrease was not maintained 6 to 18 months after treatment, but was observed again after 2 years of treatment, and maintained until the completion of the 5-year immunotherapy period. In cross-sectional analysis, the 6 patients who received treatment for 3 years, and 9 of the 12 patients who received treatment for 5 years, had negative BAT results. Three patients in this last group had positive BAT results and 2 patients had systemic reactions after field stings. CONCLUSIONS: BAT appears to be an optimal non-invasive test for close monitoring of VIT.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10662/8264
Date: 2016


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